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Archives for : February2016

3 Common Dietary Fallacy’s That Could Be Stalling Your Progress

In todays world of health and fitness it may seem like everyone is an expert. All you have to do is log on to your Facebook or Instagram and you are probably flooded with advertisements for “building your dream body”, or “the best weight-loss coach ever”. So where do you start? Who to trust?

Everyone’s body reacts differently. To think that because one diet worked for your friend or training partner does not necessarily mean that it will work for you. Below are 3 common fallacy’s that many people will fall prey too. Avoid these mistakes and enjoy better results!

1.) Cookie-Cutter Diets: If you spend a decent amount of time in the gym you probably know of at least one person who is a self-proclaimed expert thinking that they have found the “secret” to that six pack you have been searching for. If it sounds too good to be true; it likely is! Much of nutrition (coach or not) is trial and error. Avoid a “one size fits all” diet. When searching for a coach look for someone who is willing to listen, assess your indidivdual needs, and take your lifestyle in to consideration. Avoid advice from anyone who proclaims “my diet plan will work for everyone.” You will likely find that you will save yourself a lot of time, and money.

2.) The Only Way to Lose Weight is to Eliminate Fats and Carbs from Your Diet: This is surprisingly common misconception that many people have. Often times I find that people are actually eating too little. It is true that many people are carbohydrate sensitive, but to think that you can never eat carbs is absurd. There is a time and place for all macros. When constructing an eating plan that works for you, I always recommend starting on the higher end of your recommended calories. Figure out your protein and fat intake first; carbs should fill in the remainder of calories. Keep in mind that healthy fats are essential for life. Fat’s should not be dropped below 20% of your daily caloric intake for any extended amount of time. This could actually slow-down your metabolism stall progress!

3.) Don’t ever eat after 6pm: Many people will preach only consuming calories for the first half of the day, stopping eating after 6pm. While this is feasible with an intermittent fasting type diet (read about intermittent fasting Here); it is not recommended for all body types and typically is not something I recommend without guidance. It is not when we eat, but what we eat that makes all the difference. Some lean protein and healthy fats throughout the evening can actually increase your metabolism and supercharge your weight-loss and muscle gain!

Avoid these common misconceptions and you will be off to a great start!

Looking for some professional help constructing a plan that meets your needs? Click Here to schedule a consultation

Keep Moving.

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com

Fix Your Posture- Part 4

If you have not been following a long I have been discussing the beginning stages of what some may consider as an epidemic; “postural syndrome.” I have now  addressed three very important groups of muscles that are necessary for proper postural alignment.  If you missed these posts simply click on the links to catch up (click here for Part 1, Part 2, Part 3).

Continuing in our quest for great posture, today I will talk about an often over-looked sourced of rounded shoulders; the pectorals. The pectoral muscles are better known as the bench press muscles as they are responsible for adduction of the arms, and humerus. The pectoral group (composed of a major and a minor) also help to move the scapula anteriorly and inferiorly against the thoracic wall allowing for smooth motion. The pectoralis minor is of most concern as it directly attached to the scapula (shoulder) and ribs. This will serve as a perfect lever to pull those shoulder into a rounded position distorting the curves of your spine and placing abnormal stress on the muscles of the back, shoulder, and neck.

The pectoralis minor serves as a secondary breathing muscle that may be recruited in those that are deconditioned. The muscle lies in close proximity to the Thoracic Outlet, which is a small opening in your neck and shoulder where the nerves of your spine exit to innervate your limbs. When shortened this muscle may serve to close down that space creating an impingement on the nerves exiting the spine. This is commonly marked by tingling, numbness, discoloration, or coldness in the hands.  It is in your best interest in other words to be sure that this muscle is of adequate length and not causing any impingements!

Click Here to learn the #1 stretch for short, tight, pectorals!

 

Keep Moving.

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com

Fix Your Posture- Part 3

If you have not been following a long I have been discussing the beginning stages of what some may consider as an epidemic; “postural syndrome.” So far we have addressed two very important groups of muscles that are necessary for proper postural alignment.  If you missed these posts simply click on the links to catch up (click here for Part 1, Part 2). It is important to not that these changes however do not just affect the head and neck but rather the entire spine. Moving down now to the mid-back we will begin to discuss the Rhomboids.

As discussed previously, many of us develop these postural changes due to our daily lifestyles. It is important to continue to stretch and strengthen these muscles, as many of our daily habits are fighting against proper posture; remain patient! In the image to the left we see the relative change in weight of the head due to the “slumped” posture. This position will pull he shoulders forward neurologically inhibiting the Rhomboid’s. The rhomboids are composed of a major and a minor. They are responsible for scapular retraction (pinching the shoulder blades together) and rotation of the scapula (the opposite of the picture to the left.) The rhomboids are very important for scapulothoracic rhythm ( raising your arm above your head without impingement) so Cross-Fitter’s tune in! Many people will develop rotator cuff issues due to inactivity of these muscles. Pay attention to how you are sitting currently, you will probably notice that your shoulders are pulled forward. This position means that the rhomboids are not currently active. The issue with this is over-time many of us will adapt this posture no matter what the position, seated or standing, walking, running, working-out etc. This is a recipe for disaster for anyone who is actively into working out. In fact, many of you probably do not even know how to properly contract your rhomboids. With over activity of the upper trapezius and levator scapulae the rhomboids often forget how to work properly so it is important to include rhomboid work into your routine on a weekly basis even after you have began to notice improvements in your posture.

Want to learn how to fix your posture? Click Here.

 

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com

Fix Your Posture- Part 2

In last week’s post I discussed the beginning stages of a “postural syndrome” that occurs due to many of our sedentary lifestyles. I addressed the upper trapezius, and levator scapulae muscles which become increasingly tight in many of us pulling our shoulders forward creating that “slumped” postural appearance and forward head carriage.

It is important to begin stretching these tight muscles immediately if you are experiencing back or neck pain. If these muscles stay in this abnormal strained position no matter how many times we mobilize the joints the muscles will be pulling everything right back.

 

Be patient! These postural distortions did not happen over-night and will not be fixed over night. Much like your muscles make the necessary connections to learn to ride a bicycle or a skateboard, your body will also adapt to abnormal postural stress’s creating a “postural syndrome” seen above.

Now that we have began stretching the tight, over-active, muscles, we must also address the muscles which have become under-active due to these compensations. The group of muscles that we will address today are known as the Deep Neck Flexors. Due to the forward head carriage (see above) these muscles become increasingly under-active due the over-activity of the upper trapezius and levator muscles, among others we will discuss.

The deep neck flexors are a group of muscles consisting of the Longus Colli, Longus Capitis,  Rectus Capitis Anterior, and Rectus Capitis Lateralis. This group of muscles is responsible for forward and side bending of the head and neck. They serve to support the weight of the head, and stabilize the head and neck; similar to the abdominal core making them essential for proper posture.

Click Here to read he full article!

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com