Rss

Archives for : CrossfitBillerica

What is Piriformis Syndrome?

One common complaint in just about every Chiropractic clinic is that of the dreaded “Sciatica.” Contrary to many people’s beliefs “Sciatica” is not a diagnosis but rather a symptom. Sciatica simply means that someone is experiencing pain or discomfort in their back and leg. The question that the clinician must answer is always; “why is this happening?” Scatica can be the result of a few different diagnoses. It could be the result of a nerve being pinched by a disc herniation, it could be the result of arthritis, or quite commonly it is caused by tight muscles in the back, glutes and hips.

So what is “Piriformis Syndrome” and what does it have to do with sciatica? One common cause of sciatic nerve impingement is the piriformis muscle. This muscle lies deep to your glutes and works as and external rotator of the leg. In majority of people the sciatic nerve passes underneath the piriformis muscle, however in some the nerve passes through the muscle making it more susceptible to impingment. Most patients presenting with this condition complain mainly of deep, dull gluteal pain. This can also be experienced as burning and tingling in the leg which is noted by many people depending on position. One of the main causes of piriformis symdrome is poor biomechanics of the pelvis and spine. This could be due to muscle imbalances, poor posture, or simply an increase in training intensity or change in terrain. When the muscle becomes too tight, it spasms compressing the neve causing you pain!

Runners pay attention, this is one of the most common problems runners present with in my office! Why? Running is very linear, relying mostly on the glute maximus for hip extension and the quads for hip flexion. This means that the glute maximus will often develop trigger points causing spasms which will compress the prirformis muscle.

A few tips for prevention:
•Your body is like a high peformance car, it is very in-tune and even the smallest deviation can cause major problems. See a Chiropractic Physician! Poor biomechanics will always lead to issues.
•Warm-up before your work-out’s with light jogging or walking.
•Stretch your hamstrings, calves, and glutes

Think you may have Piriformis Sydrome ? We have successfully helped many runner’s and athletes with this condition. Give us a call! (781) 460-0939

Keep Moving.

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com

The Top 3 Exercise’s for Sciatica

Sciatic nerve pain or “sciatica” is characterized by burning, tingling, or numbness in one side of the buttock or leg which is relatively constant. The cause is related to compression of spinal nerves as they exit the spine. ” Sciatica” is not a specific diagnosis but a collection of symptoms. The cause of sciatica is commonly due to other medical conditions such as a disc herniation, or degenerative changes of the lumbar spine which decreases the space impinging the nerves. Below are some common symptoms that people note during “sciatica”:

  • Relatively constant pain on one side of the buttocks and/or hamstring.
  • Hamstring or calve pain that is described as burning, tingling, or numb.
  • Pain that is worse when walking or sitting
  •  Possible progressive weakness or “dead leg.”

When dealing with sciatica it is important to first visit a Chiropractic Physician or other spine specialist in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis. Contrary to past beliefs, “resting” the area more than a few days is not recommended. Resting more than a few days may lead to deconditioning of the surrounding muscles which may increase pressure on the irritated nerve(s) making symptoms worse. Additionally, the intervertebral discs in your spine serve as shock absorbers. There is no blood supply to the discs since they consist of cartilage. They rely on movement in order to imbibe water keeping the discs full, healthy, and nourished preventing desiccation and degenerative change. By incorporating the appropriate exercises (and eliminating some bad ones), you can strengthen the surrounding muscles, effectively decreasing pressure on the spine and preventing further occurrence’s or exacerbations. Below are 3 of my personal favorites for bracing the abdomen:

1.)Cat-Cow-

  • Begin on all four’s.
  •  Take a deep breathe in through your nose slowly filling your belly with air.
  •  Arch your back dropping your belly to the ground slowly; head up.
  •  Begin to exhale slowly drawing your hips under your body by contracting your abdomen; hold 2-3 seconds.
  • Repeat cycle (1 cycle = 1 rep)

2.) Press-Up’s-

  • Begin by lying face down on a soft surface
  • Place your palms down as if in push-up position.
  • Leaving your thighs on the ground, begin to slowly press-up, lifting your upper torso off the ground; hold 2-3 seconds, then repeat.

3.) Pelvic Tilts-

  • Begin lying on your back face-up, knees bent.
  • Take a deep breathe in through your nose, arching your back slightly pushing your stomach out.
  • Exhale slowly, pushing your belly button through the floor by contracting your abdomen; hold 2-3 seconds, then repeat cycle (1 cycle = 1 rep).

As always, please consult a health professional before attempting to self-treat.

If you are currently experiencing sciatica pain, Click Here to schedule an appointment and start healing today!

Keep Moving.

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com

Fix Your Posture- Part 2

In last week’s post I discussed the beginning stages of a “postural syndrome” that occurs due to many of our sedentary lifestyles. I addressed the upper trapezius, and levator scapulae muscles which become increasingly tight in many of us pulling our shoulders forward creating that “slumped” postural appearance and forward head carriage.

It is important to begin stretching these tight muscles immediately if you are experiencing back or neck pain. If these muscles stay in this abnormal strained position no matter how many times we mobilize the joints the muscles will be pulling everything right back.

 

Be patient! These postural distortions did not happen over-night and will not be fixed over night. Much like your muscles make the necessary connections to learn to ride a bicycle or a skateboard, your body will also adapt to abnormal postural stress’s creating a “postural syndrome” seen above.

Now that we have began stretching the tight, over-active, muscles, we must also address the muscles which have become under-active due to these compensations. The group of muscles that we will address today are known as the Deep Neck Flexors. Due to the forward head carriage (see above) these muscles become increasingly under-active due the over-activity of the upper trapezius and levator muscles, among others we will discuss.

The deep neck flexors are a group of muscles consisting of the Longus Colli, Longus Capitis,  Rectus Capitis Anterior, and Rectus Capitis Lateralis. This group of muscles is responsible for forward and side bending of the head and neck. They serve to support the weight of the head, and stabilize the head and neck; similar to the abdominal core making them essential for proper posture.

Click Here to read he full article!

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com

Conservative Management of “Runner’s Knee”

A chronically painful knee can be not only painful for the athlete but can also be very difficult to diagnose. This is because often times the pain can be vague and seem to “come and go.” After ruling out any more serious complications, I find one common cause of knee pain is known as “runners knee” otherwise known as patellofemoral pain syndrome. This is characterized by vague pain behind and around the knee cap often made worse with activity, bending,  and going down stairs. Mild swelling may also be noted. The cause is typically multifactorial and usually related to over-use. Muscle imbalances in the legs resulting from pelvic, knee, and feet alignment issues are typically present.

How is it Diagnosed?

A physical exam will be performed with range of motion and orthopedic testing of the knee. You doctor may also order an X-Ray or MRI if he feels necessary. Pain is often noted in deep flexion especially when weight bearing(such as squatting) and is frequently felt behind the knee often made worse with activity.

How is it Treated?

Step number one is to consult your physician and have the knee examined. Most cases of runners knee require some professional intervention or they may become chronic. Initial treatment may include passive modalities such as ultra-sound, muscle stimulation, or heat. The alignment of the knee, hips and feet will need to be addressed by a chiropractic physician. Additionally, rehabilitation exercises should be prescribed in order to correct the underlying problems with muscle imbalances. This can be corrected through techniques such as myofascial release, manipulation, and therapeutic exercise.

The bottom Line

Consult a chiropractic physician or sports medicine doctor for an accurate diagnosis and to rule out more serious pathologies. The treatment plan should include a multifactorial approach including passive modalities, manipulation of any joint dysfunctions, and therapeutic exercise to correct muscle imbalance’s.

 

Keep Moving.

 

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com

Chronic Ankle Sprains? Fix Your Feet With These Simple Drills

Most active people have suffered an ankle sprain at one time or another accompanied by swelling, pain, weakness, and a long road to complete recovery!  Many runners and athletes may find themselves more susceptible to future sprains and strains even after the initial problem has resolved. This is because soft-tissue healing can take anywhere from 12-18 months and there is usually always involvement of one or more ligament!

A bit about the anatomy of your ankles. The ankle is held together by several ligaments: on the inside of the ankle you have the deltoid ligaments (less likely to sprain) among others, and on the outside of the ankle you have the anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments a long with the calcaneofibular ligaments to name a few. Most sprains/strains of the ankle occur from excessive plantar flexion and inversion (about 80%) affecting the lateral ligaments (most commonly the anterior talofibular ligaments). These ligaments (even when over-stretched and not torn) take a very long time to heal and when no treatment is given to promote healing will cause the tissue to heal abnormally (think of a patch over a hole) causing less tissue extensibility and improper function. Remember, there is no blood supply to the tendon itself.  Over-time this exacerbates muscle imbalances and leads to a chronic biomechanical deficit. This being said, some intervention is necessary to ensure that the tissue heals properly to prevent future sprain/strains.

In the early stages of an ankle sprain your doctor or therapist should advise a couple of days of rest and elevation. In addition to resting and elevating at home your doctor should also recommend manual therapy techniques to facilitate healing. This may include manipulation of the joint, traction, heat, myofascial release, and eventual therapeutic exercise. It is very important to address joint stiffness early on to ensure proper movement and healing.

“Weak ankles” become an issue when the tissues discussed above heal improperly; usually because no treatment was received. This will exacerbate existing muscle imbalances leading to dysfunction making you more susceptible to injury. The solution to this issue is to reestablish appropriate movement and fix muscle imbalances. Most athletes I see that suffer from chronic ankle sprains exhibit deficits in their gait, hips, and lower leg muscles. These deficits have likely been an issue for a long time and have continued to build until an injury occurs.

Does this sound like you? First, have your gait evaluated by your doctor or therapist, then try these simple drills to help balance the muscles in your feet and lower leg. You will notice a stronger, more athletic ankle!

All drills to be performed shoes-off (except for walking on your heals) and for a length of about 25 meters; preferably on grass or any hard surface:

  1. Walk with feet inverted
  2. Walk with feet toe-in
  3. Walk backwards on your toes
  4. Walk with feet everted
  5. Walk with feet toe-out
  6. Walk on heels

Dr. James Ellis

www.evolvedhealthchiropractic.com